Login
Username

Password



Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Tags - Krokus
All Tags
Krokus - 1976 Krokus
The Krokus heard here is far removed from their eventual direction in the 80's, with more progressive shades apparent, very typical of the period, with more than a passing nod to the likes of Yes or even Manfred Mann at their most explosive.

Krokus - 1980 Metal Rendezvous
From Switzerland, these guys changed horses like some guys change their cars. Krokus started life out as a prog based outfit during the mid-seventies, then diverting to a metal sound, with more than a headshake to the heroes of the time AC/DC.

Krokus - 1981 Hardware
This album shows the leaps and bounds Krokus had made since Storace joined. The awkward early albums were a good starting point, but here the band had identified a certain sound and were truly on their way to perfecting it.

Krokus - 1982 One Vice At A Time
'One Vice At A Time' seems to be totally unloved in the review department, with just about every significant album of theirs covered except this one.. Until now that is.

Krokus - 1983 Headhunter
'Headhunter' marked the end of Krokus' boogie era, which had lasted for four albums since 1978, and saw them take their one real shot at traditional heavy metal. It was a good shot. 'Headhunter' was the best metal album of 1983.

Krokus - 1984 The Blitz
This album definitely was a new direction for Krokus, moving away from metal and even hard rock to a smooth and streamlined rock sound more in line with where bands like Loverboy and Bon Jovi were (without the keyboards).

Krokus - 1986 Change Of Address
Although Krokus constantly still find chart success in their native Switzerland, this album was their final fling in terms of worldwide success, but to my mind they bailed out with their best..

Krokus - 1990 Stampede
Taking their cue from Judas Priest and AC/DC, Krokus an album that is heavier and better produced than anything since 'Headhunter'. But without Marc Storace leading from the front, the band lost their identity.

Krokus - 1999 Round 13
A Krokus album without Marc Storace is like a cheese sandwich without the cheese.. Right? Well, replacement singer Carl Sentence does his best to kick start the Swiss rockers on a path laden with AC/DC and Deep Purple landmarks.

Krokus - 2003 Rock The Block
At fourteen tracks this is overlong, with scant few of them standing out. In nearly thirty years of recorded music this ranks for me as Krokus' weakest album.

Krokus - 2010 Hoodoo
After a couple of dodgy releases in the past decade ('Rock the Block' and 'Hellraiser'), Krokus have returned with their best album since 1999 and one which reunites the vintage 'One Vice At A Time' lineup from 1982.

Krokus - 2013 Dirty Dynamite
I'm staggered at how this album collapses in a heap so rapidly and completely. Krokus have been inconsistent at the best of times, but to raise hopes with five excellent songs and then totally blow it is a bit disconcerting.

Krokus - 2014 Long Stick Goes Boom: Live From da House of Rust
After seeing Krokus live for the first time a few weeks back on their recent U.S. jaunt, it inspired me to revisit this live album from last year, one which I'm sure most people barely know exists besides Krokus enthusiasts.

Krokus - 2017 Big Rocks
A Covers album? Just a cursory glance at the tracklist reveals all you need to know about this debacle.