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Articles Home » 1986 Articles » Synch - 1986 Get The Feelin'
 
Synch - 1986 Get The Feelin'



ARTIST: Synch
ALBUM: Get The Feelin'
LABEL: Countach
SERIAL: -
YEAR: 1986

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN:

LINEUP: Jim Harnen - lead vocals * Chuck Yarmey - keyboards, backing vocals * Jon Lorrance - lead guitar, backing vocals * Rich Kossuth - acoustic drums, electronic drums, DX drum machine * Bill Kossuth - keyboards, backing vocals * Mike Warner - bass, keyboards, backing vocals

TRACK LISTING: 01 Don't Walk Away On Love * 02 Thinkin' Of You * 03 Playin' A Game * 04 Where Are You Now (Live) * 05 Hot Summer Night * 06 Only For The Night * 07 Give Love Another Try * 08 Don't Stop Believin' * 09 I Want You * 10 Somethin' We Already Had


Background
Another band like Magnum(US version) that have close ties with Pennsylvanian legends Dakota. It would appear that Messrs Hludzik, Kelly and Manwiller took on something of a mentoring role for Synch as they both produced and arranged the album for the band. In fact there's something of an incestuous relationship going on here, given that guitarist Jon Lorrance eventually resurfaced in the line-up of Dakota when the band reformed in the late nineties, early noughties. If the above doesn't give you an inkling as to what Synch sound like then the carefully stage managed group photo complete with requisite bouffant hairstyles surely does. Then again, if you're still stumped - the two keyboard players and four backing singers is another tell-tale clue - yes you've guessed it, this is classic AOR.


The Songs
Fortunately the band have spent equally as much time and attention to cultivating their AOR sensibilities as they have their immaculately coiffured appearance. The Dakota influence is obvious from the start as 'Don't Walk Away From Love' is a classy ballad with layered keyboards, tempered guitar and some delicate harmonies. 'Thinkin Of You' raises the tempo, its high tech opening building into an energetic workout with a great chorus and surging guitar work from Jon Lorrance. This is followed by a couple of live cuts from a concert at Seton Catholic High School. This seems to be a very appropriate choice of venue as the music these guys play is very wholesome and unthreatening. Somehow you can't imagine Kiss or Van Halen being invited to perform the same gig. 'Playin' A Game' is prime time AOR with all the distinguishing hallmarks - the strutting guitar, neatly interspersed with stabbing keyboard fills. Jon Lorrance is even allowed the opportunity to cut loose with a well-oiled guitar solo. In fact he distinguishes himself throughout the album with some impressive fretboard action. Having worked their audience of Catholic schoolgirls into a frenzy (well if the intro is anything to go by..) things are calmed down somewhat with 'Where Are You Now?' I'm not a great fan of this song if I'm being honest, though it's slightly less insipid in a live environment. Side one closer the upbeat rocker 'Hot Summer Night' is a vast improvement. The chorus lifted straight out of the Dakota songbook. It comes as no surprise then to find that it was actually penned by Messrs Hludzik and Manwiller.

Side two continues the momentum in spectacular fashion, the raw and dirty guitar riffing from Jon Lorrance contrasting nicely with the strident keyboards and delicious harmonies on the chorus. The tasteful keyboard intro to 'Give Love Another Try' is yet another song guaranteed to have AOR fans swooning in the aisles. The band maintain the energy levels with an excellent version of the Dakota classic 'Don't Stop Believin'. Whilst it's not quite the equal of the original version it succeeds in running it a very close second. The upbeat 'I Want You' is characterised by its high tech keyboard stylings, but Jon Lorrance's biting guitar, the punchy chorus and pumping bass ensures that this is no wimp out. Ending proceedings is the driving 'Something We Already Had' it's dripping with melody and has yet another terrific guitar solo from Jon Lorrance.


In Summary
It's easy to understand to why this album is highly sought after by AOR collectors and Dakota fans, because despite the fact it's an independent release the band display major label qualities. As has been documented elsewhere on this site, the song 'Where Are You Now?' took on a new lease of life several years later, culminating in Harnen inking a deal with Polygram and releasing a solo album 'Can't Fight The Midnight'. That was a good album but not a patch on this earlier effort with his former bandmates.


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Comments
#1 | gdazegod on February 20 2014 12:00:43
Synch - Where Are You Now
YouTube Video:
#2 | super80boy on February 26 2014 02:56:29
Great entry selection! This one is quite a scarce album to come by these days. It's been a long time since I've listened to my copy, so this was the nudge I needed to rediscover this little AOR gem. I agree with you on 'Where Are You Now', it's a bit wimpy and could have used some better guitar work...maybe a studio version would have been better…Other than that slight misstep, there are a bunch of hook laden cuts on display. Side 2 has a bevy of exceptional, highly energetic cuts with aggressive guitars that really add some meat to the melodies. Highly recommended for the vinyl AOR collectors seeking a rare private press pearl.
#3 | swazi on February 27 2014 23:08:33
Really really good release. Unfortunately not available in CD format yet. Would deserve a proper reissue, though.
 
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